2011/10/27

Boo! (FFwD: Pumpkins stuffed w/ Everything Good)

To me, pumpkins mean falling leaves, cold evenings & blustery "Winnie the Pooh winds".  As I drove across the back roads of Southern Texas mentally formulating a post about a pumpkin stuffed with "everything good", I am found myself caught off-guard by the spotty patches of grass, the palm tree lined driveways with Halloween themed decorations gracing the edge of a gated drive leading to a far-off ranch.  In the back of my mind, I am thinking that no person who hails so far North of the Mason-Dixon line should be cruising these roads.  And I wonder if they knew, if I would be welcome here. 

The scenery of falling multi-colored leaves left behind in NY is replaced with views of long-horns grazing under the backdrop of a chemical refinery.  We aren't in Kansas any more, Toto.  Not at all. 

How is one supposed to focus on pumkins when looking at palm trees and grazing steer?  Seriously.

 

Pumpkins.  Pumpkins. 

When I made this, it was a cool fall day.  In early October.  In Upstate NY.  Uh huh.

Sugar Pie pumpkins were just hitting their peak and were popping out of the local farms left and right (at least those farms that didn't lose their crop to Irene & Lee).

Oh pretty pumpkins. 

(Pssst - I found one that weighed exactly 3 pounds.  It was like a scavenger hunt.)


Pumpkin seeds were scooped out & tossed in a light coating of oil and were sprinkled with paprika, salt and cayenne - then were toasted in the oven until they were crunchy.  (The seeds are the best part of the pumpkin, after all...)


Left over bread heels were cubed and tossed with cream, bacon, cheese...  Topped with chives. And baked. And baked. And baked.  (It kind of took a while)


Sorry - I didn't take any pictures of the carnage pumpkin after it was cut into.  I served it in wedges (didn't read the trick about squishing everything up together until much later).  But I think I liked it as a wedge - the filling was like a topping.  Kind of like a loaded potato.  Except it was pumpkin.  I am sure that makes sense, right?

This post participates in French Fridays with Dorie.

28 comments:

  1. I loved this one! It was a real hit in our house and will be added to our holiday traditions! Great photos! Good example about a loaded potato...

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  2. haha--yeah, welcome to my world. A Yankee in Texas. I'm scratching at the windows here. lol

    Your pumpkin looks great! I'm jealous of your seeds. My pumpkin's seeds were translucent and bendy. I chucked them.

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  3. I LOVED this so much! Can't wait to make it again!

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  4. Ooh...I want to swim in your filling, Cher! I wish that pumpkin was big enough ;-). Your pumpkin seeds would keep me happy in front of the TV for a while...they look absolutely lovely. The were about 5 seeds in mine, the downside of using a miniature squash - sorry, pumpkin. Boo!

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  5. I cut mine up in wedges too - I only learned about the mush up thing after reading a few posts!

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  6. Cher...your looks nice...I did mine with lesser cream thus there was no swimming for the bacon and the rest of ingredients :p but it is hit with my Wild Boar and myself. Love it. Flavorful !

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  7. One of my favorite AMFT recipes, ever. Yours looks delicious - I assume you used The Bacon. :) In which case it had to be fabulous! About the South ... I'm a summer girl (so I'm down with heat), but it would be difficult to live where the leaves don't turn. I <3 Fall.

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  8. Your pumpkin looks tasty. I'm loving the image of palm trees with Halloween decoration.

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  9. I've looked at palm trees everyday for my entire life. We know it's fall when the Santa Ana winds blow the palm fronds off the trees and litter them across yards and streets! Your pumpkin looks delicious. I'll need to try this again with staler bread...ours was a bit mushy!

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  10. Funny how we give foods and their seasonality such different meaning. I guess I take pumpkins for granted - they are a year-round crop here in PR.

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  11. Ha, yes, I would feel strange making this anywhere that wasn't a little blustery! Your filling looks fab.

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  12. So your post made me homesick, as I'm a displaced Texan. I love the change of seasons but sometimes miss that year round green and heat. Then I laughed because I missed that tip about mixing it all up together until after the fact. It was like a stuffed potato wedge :)

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  13. Great looking pumpkin. I know what you mean about getting into the "Fall" spirit in a summery place. When we first moved to AZ, from Upstate NY, the holidays seemed so out of place. How can you have snowmen with no snow, and we are still swimming on Halloween. But we are good at it now. I think all the traditional foods really make a difference. Even though this is the best time for gardening in AZ...finally getting some fresh local veges...we learn to think "pumpkin", etc...and it works.

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  14. Yeah, somehow palm trees don't seem so autumnal! Loved this one :)

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  15. I hear ya!! We are trying to stay positive but it just isn't the same as fall in the NE. You called it!

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  16. It looks like your upstate NY home may be getting some snow and jumping into winter! Can you believe it? We are in Florida so I know exactly what you mean. Your pumpkin looks gorgeous...the filling is so creamy looking! Glad you enjoyed it!

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  17. Of course we understand! :) our "risotto" stuffing came out as a shaped wedge on its own and then the pumpkin wedge came out looking nicely also... but they kinda fell apart separately on the plate, still looking good though.

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  18. I completely understand - it's hard to get into the idea of fall when you see palm trees. I live it every year! (don't even think of trying that around Christmas!)
    I'm sending the turkeys outside this year, just so that I can make a couple of these (admittedly, easier to do in AZ). Great that you had so much fun with this!

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  19. You are about the only Dorie-ite who found a three-pound pumpkin. That, in itself, gives you the blue ribbon this week. My pumpkin traveled beautifully from the pot to the platter to the table. Cutting it into slices was dicey (I need to practice that) but we still loved this dish. A choice for our Thanksgiving table.

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  20. looks wonderful! your stuff almost looks like a chunky-creamy soup!

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  21. Looks great, Cher. I love the idea of squishing and scooping, too, although I wedged mine like you did. I think this would be great with bread pudding as a dessert, don't you?

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  22. You found a nice thick pumpkin, Cher. It looks great and it sounds like everyone enjoyed it. I also toasted the pumpkin seeds from mine and they are so tasty. Glad you had a safe trip back home!

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  23. Forget about palm trees, falling leaves, etc. after yesterday's storm, it's
    winter here now. About cleaning out a pumpkin I guess I was just lucky
    to talk my way around that one. However, Tricia and I had a pumpkin
    patch while living in NJ, but I always removed the flowers for frying.
    An old Italian tradition. I would love to be able to buy them, but it
    is not something you see often. They are simply delicious. Great job
    on your pumpkin.

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  24. Your stuffed pumpkin turned out wonderfully. I can't wait to give the recipe this try!:)Happy Halloween, Cher!

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  25. wow...very catchy..
    interesting presentation..love it..:)
    happy following you..
    check out mine sometime..
    Tasty Appetite

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  26. I spent one fall outside of Dallas for an extended work training class. Felt like I was on another planet - just so different. Still had a blast and my kids came to trick or treat in Plano (not too shabby :) I had to chuckle because I followed you on some other blog and read your comment that you bought texas cookie cutters. When I was there I managed to buy a texas state shaped waffle iron- no, I am not kidding. It was by one of the good Italian manufacturers and at a gourment store...but WHAT was I thinking :) We got a bunch of snow here and my hubby ran up to Vt- and was then afraid he would be stuck there with 9 inches of snow. I love autumn, pumpkins filled with everything good, and hope to see more of both !!!

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  27. Your pumpkin looks great! Glad you enjoyed the recipe.

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  28. My pumpkin was very close to three pounds too. I bought mine at Trader Joe's where they don't have scales because everything is priced by the piece. I told the person I asked about the scale that sometimes (often?) a recipe asks for a specific weight. Thankfully I chose well!

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