2013/04/16

If I had a nickel... (Tuesdays with Dorie BwJ: Madeleines)


"In an old house in Paris that was covered with vines lived twelve little girls in two straight lines.
In two straight lines they broke their bread and brushed their teeth and went to bed.
They smiled at the good and frowned at the bad and sometimes they were very sad.
They left the house at half past nine in two straight lines in rain or shine — the smallest one was Madeline."

From: Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans


If I had a nickel for every time I heard those words when my girls were little.

Of course, at that stage in my life, I didn't know that Madeline was anything more than a girl's name.

It wasn't until The Transporter that I had seen a Madeleine in the cookie form. I was intrigued, but since they needed their own pan, I wasn't motivated.


Fast forward a few years when a stroll through a kitchen supply store would yield a Madeleine pan. Now mind you, I had yet to see a Madeleine in real life; but I knew I had recipes for them lurking in my cookbook collection. 

Now, I was heavily intrigued and slightly motivated. 

I am not sure how long it was after the pan acquisition before I made my first batch of Madeleines, but I do remember the exact recipe it was - Earl Grey Madeleines from Dorie Greenspan's Baking: From My Home to Yours. It was one of those weekends where it was just the Culinary Kid and I. We tackled our very first duck a la orange together (we had never had duck before either) and made our first batch of Madeleines for dessert. 

I don't know why we waited so long for the duck or the Madeleines - it was love at first bite.


Fast forward another few years and many batches of Madeleines later. Tuesdays with Dorie introduces a new form of Madeleines to the picture - essentially ladyfinger batter squeezed into a Madeleine tin. I added a little fiori di sicilia to the mix - because I could. 

What to say? This recipe didn't give me any trouble. It baked up beautifully. And I am sure they would be lovely dunked in a cuppa. 

But were they for me? Not so much. I like my lady fingers soaked in coffee and topped with mascarpone  - in the form of Tiramisu. And I like my Madeleines a little bit cakier - with the tea already infused into the butter. 

I guess, I like what I like - no more, no less.   

Peace out. 



This post participates in Tuesdays with Dorie. The recipe for Madeleines can be found over on the site of this week's hosts: Katie and Amy Thisdell of Counter Dog.

29 comments:

  1. I love your writing and your creativity. the Madeleines look beautiful

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  2. Great post - your madeleines look beautiful. I would have preferred them cakier as well. Mine were on the verge of rubbery.

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  3. Ladyfingers are so common in this country, but madeleines are almost non-existent. And I would never use the same batter for both. But you did a great job Cher, and those round ones are the cutest! I´ll check out the earl grey ones.

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  4. Lovely! I think that first exposures sometimes become our standards. This one doesn't match, so it's not as good.

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  5. These are my first Madeleines, and they did seem a bit dry. I'm definitely going to try the ones from Baking. Love your post as always!

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  6. Cher, your madeleines (traditional and flowery shaped) are very pretty and you are the second one who was so creative as to add the fiori di sicilia to the dough - I had never heard of this ingredient before but it sounds like it was quite a wonderful addition to these pretty little French tea cakes of yours.

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  7. I used to read that story to my daughter and then to my granddaughter!! I always loved it! This was not a new adventure for me either. I have made many madeleines through the years.
    Yours look simply beautiful! Nice post, Cher!

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  8. I used the Madeline rhyme in my post, too! I also thought these were a little dry so maybe I should try the other recipes you and other TWD bakers have pointed out. Thanks!

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  9. These were definitely not cakey enough. Harrumph.

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  10. Keep the duck, toss the cookie. Agreed.

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  11. Your madeleines are so pretty!

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  12. Madeleines looks very appetizing but for some reason picture of batter is the most exciting one (to me) :)

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  13. my first impression of these madeleines-meh...i think i like your idea better; soak 'em in espresso and rum, slather them with a mascarpone and make a tiramisu!

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  14. My youngest sister was named Madeleine after the books...my parents ran out of names by the time #4 daughter came along! At that time, we had no clue there was a mini cake of the same name. Yeah, mine were dry (or overbaked)...not my favorites.

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  15. Your rose ones look so pretty! I didn't have time to do it this week, so I'm glad to hear they weren't amazing.

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  16. the Earl Grey Mads were my first too. And they were better than these. Love the little roses.

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  17. The Earl Grey mads were my first ones, too. And they were better. Love the little roses.

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  18. What a beautiful post, thanks for sharing. Blessings, Catherine www.praycookblog.com

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  19. I think a lot of people found this Madeleine recipe falling a bit short. I can definitely see them as ladyfingers though.

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  20. Yeap, I agree these would be a perfect base for a tiramisu or a triffle or even for a lazy combo of greek yogurt + jam. The flowery madeleines are real beauties. Spring is in the air :)

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  21. I liked Dorie's madelines much better than this recipe because I also prefer them more cake-like and with more flavor. Your madeleines look so pretty and I'm glad you used your mini-flower pan again. :)

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  22. Haha I loved the Madeleine reference :D
    And I love the look of your delicious Madeleines!

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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  23. Ha, I think the first time I saw actual madeleines was in The Transporter too! I'm going to have to try one of Dorie's own recipes for madeleines, 'cause this one just didn't do it for me either. Yours certainly do look beautiful, though! I love those little rosettes!

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  24. I'm glad to know maybe there is some hope for me and madeleines. I am going to have to try another recipe. Even if they weren't your favorite, they look great!

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  25. I've been meaning to try the Earl Grey madeleine recipe, perhaps I will, now that J has the madeleine-making bug. I'm also intrigued by the flavour both you and Liz used - it sounds lovely.

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  26. I loved reading the beginning of Madeleine, I hadn't thought about that in ages. The Early Grey ones sound interesting, I may try those next time. Even if I hadn't totally messed these up, I still think I would've found them a bit plain.

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  27. I didn't like these either. I added lemon to them and they were still kind of "meh."

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  28. I had to laugh when I read about the transporter- madeleines always make me think of that movie!

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  29. I loved watching Madeleine when I was younger. Good memories. :) Your madeleines look great! I've never heard of fiori di sicilia before, but after looking it up, oh man, I need some of that! Thanks!

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