2013/04/02

Outhouse (Tuesdays with Dorie BwJ: Rustic Potato Loaves)

Rustic.

You know what comes to mind when I hear the word "rustic"?

The three-holed outhouse that sat up on my grandmother's plot of land by the lake - where our family used to spend summers during my childhood.

Each summer we would spend several weeks in a tent - later on, in a camper - near the lake and well, using the outhouse was necessary to do the necessary.

Sigh.


As totally inelegant as the whole concept of outhouses can be - my real fear of them came in the once darkness took over. I was absolutely convinced throughout most of my youth that some animal was going to get me a) on my way to the outhouse (bear, skunk) or b) while I was in the outhouse (mice, squirrel, snake).

In the middle of the night, that twenty foot walk to the outhouse felt like a mile.

I am sure I was a great source of irritation to my parents when I woke them up in the middle of the night to come out and hold a light for me so that I wouldn't have to make the trek in total darkness. At one point my parents bought me a very, very large flashlight - I think those late night wakenings may have been a trigger for that gift...

So yeah, that's what is indelibly imprinted on my mind when I hear the word "rustic".


Fortunately, this week's brush with rustic is of a different nature.

It does not portend any tales of dangerous wildlife.

The wildest part of this tale is the presence of potato skins in in a loaf of bread.

Gasp.

No potatoes were peeled in the making of this bread (which is a total bonus in my book).


When someone doubts the virtues of making bread at home, I will often steer them toward a potato bread.

Something special happens when potato is brought into the mix. That starchy little tuber takes a perfectly respectable, but perhaps somewhat crumbly bread and elevates it to a soft tender bite of heaven.

That. Is a type of rustic that I can deal with any day.

Potentially skunk laden outhouses in the middle of the night?  Not so much.

Peace out.


This post participates in Tuesdays with Dorie. The recipe for Rustic Potato Loaves can be found on the site of this week's host: Dawn of Simply Sweet.

34 comments:

  1. LOL - I wasn't sure how you were going to segue from outhouses to bread, but you did it. Lovely bread - I like how it is shiny on top.

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  2. Beautiful loaf! I've never made a potato bread. Add it to my list!

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  3. What you don't think "Mardi's attempt to make it look like something was SUPPOSED to look like that" when you hear the word "rustic"? ;) Nice one Cher!

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  4. An impressive segue, I agree. Thanks for steering me to this bread. I'm on a bread roll of late and I need more easy, good breads in my repertoire. Will try.

    I'm all to familiar with outhouses. In fact, my husband just erected one on a piece of property we use as our own private gameland. A three-holer? That's a high class outhouse.

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  5. Cher, only you could make me giggle about outhouses! I peeled my potatoes before reading the recipe, so it's good to know this bread worked OK with the peels included :)

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  6. I haven't made this one yet because of Passover, but I'm really excited to try it. Yours looks delicious.

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  7. I've had a lifelong dread of outhouses. In my area, 5th graders from all over the city had to spend several days at Camp Kern. Even as a youngster, I wasn't the camping sort, but the bus ride to Camp Kern killed that potential for all time. One of the escorts took the drive-time to warn us of the dangers of the outdoors. She went into exquisitely painful detail of how spiders - spiders that bite - love to build webs in the holes of outhouses, and that if you don't check before sitting down, you might get a spider bite on your bum and have to go to the hospital. To say that that ruined the trip for me and my fellow arachnophobes is an understatement. :) (And, I'm clearly still scarred by it.)

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  8. We had a "rustic" cabin in the woods when I was growing up. By "rustic," I mean electricity but no running water. We lugged 5 gallon jugs up from the spring and walked up the hill to the outhouse to "do the necessary." We'd all troop up together before bedtime. I envied my brother's ability to take care of things while standing up. Sitting down over the open hole was an act of faith.

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  9. "Rustic" is a word that brings lots of vivid pictures to mine, that's for certain. :)

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  10. Fortunately for me, my mother was never willing to take any vacation that required her to do any cooking. That left camping out of the mix. Thanks goodness. Your bread looks great!! So glad rustic has a new meaning for you!

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  11. Fabulous post! I laughed out loud! All fancy with a three whole outhouse....heehee. I had the same worries as a child too with those. (and I'd like to say I no longer have those worries, but that would be a lie....thankfully it isn't too often a worry)
    Your bread looks great. This is a fantastic recipe that I would recommend to anyone wanting to try making bread at home too.

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  12. Lovely! Much more appealing than an outhouse (which I am still afraid of).

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  13. my idea of rustic-a hotel without room service...love the story-i have had to use an outhouse during the night and i can totally relate.

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  14. Oh, this bread looks so good. I don't want to know about outhouses or camping after dark or unfriendly wild animals. "Rustic", for me, starts with the Holiday Inn and progresses up to the Four Seasons. Your bread would fit in very well in a bread basket at the Four Seasons. Glad that my move is over so i can get back to Julia and Dorie. Have missed you guys. You've done some phenomenal baking in the past two months.

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  15. So true about the outhouses. LOL! I My system totally shuts down when we go camping because I am afraid of what might bite my bum in the dark. ;) I was so happy with this bread and loved the flecks of potato. So glad that you loved it as well.

    The weather has been so different this year, but I can't believe that you are still getting snow this late! Spring will come soon, Cher!

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  16. Ha! Great post Cher. Unlikely linked topics.

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  17. I didn't care for the "rustic" added skin to this bread and now I'll always think of your idea of what is really rustic and I'll never leave the peel on a potato bread again. ;) Great post.

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  18. Cher, absolutely picture perfect looking potato bread! I love the way your bread looks, a wonderful crust and crumb. This seems to have been a real winner for all who made it and I could not agree more, a really fantastic recipe.
    Have a wonderful Wednesday!

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  19. A great story and great bread.

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  20. Your bread looks lovely! And that's a funny childhood experience- thanks for sharing :)

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  21. Good example of how ordinary things like bread can trigger random and unlikely memories. Both the recipe and the reminisce made me smile.

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  22. You reminded me of the camping trips that were my father´s idea of a vacation. How I hated them! I also thought bugs and spider would crept into my bed at night. Another fun post Cher, and amazing looking bread! It is a wonderful recipe.

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  23. LOL.Totally agree with you, the word rustic should only be associated with delicious bread. Yours looks great.

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  24. Potato in bread? This makes me want to make this so bad!!

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  25. Haha! Childhood trauma and its big scars :) Gorgeous looking potato bread!

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  26. This potato bread looks really delicious !
    I like het combination of potato and bread

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  27. Hate outhouses, loved this bread. Your loaf looks perfect. Some kinds of rustic are lovely and this was one of them! And yes, the no peeling of the potatoes made my day!

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  28. Now there's rustic and then there's rustic....I'm afraid of outhouses but potato bread-I can handle!!! When you wrote large flashlight, I though you were going to say that I lost it in the you know what-not the potato bread ;-)

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  29. Not a fan of outhouses myself, but when you gotta go, you gotta go! Loved this recipe and the flecks of peel throughout.

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  30. We used to go to Provincial campgrounds every summer, so I'm with you on the fear-of-nightly-outhouse-trips. Tourists inevitably left their garbage unsecured and there were bears making nightly rounds through many of the campsites we used.

    I really like your photo of the dough - it shows the flecks of potato skin beautifully.

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  31. Having spent my childhood summers at a "rustic" fishing camp in the wilds of Canada, I can relate. I once came inches from stepping on a hissing rattlesnake: barefoot. You never know what you're gonna find out there in the dark. My advice: hold it til morning!

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  32. Camping with outhouses 1/2 mile down the road. Yep! I remember those days well. And yes, in the dark = NO FUN!! But we survived, didn't we. Now, we have a camper - with bathroom. But not this bread which would make camping a whole lot more fun. Great looking loaf.

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